AROLA & ANZALDUA

In class, we began our discussion with Manovich and Arola’s articles in regards to social media. As far as Arola’s composition, “It’s My Revolution,” we talked about how MySpace was an outlet for users to remix themselves. MySpace can be described as an “early remix” in a sense. Choosing backgrounds and other formats for your page is a way to illustrate one’s identity. Arola explains how the “’un-seeing” of Indians” is a form of denial of the their struggles and only promotes the Indian stereotypes that are so often endorsed by popular culture (Arola 215). She relates this strife of Indians being brushed off and how it influences how mixedbloods are viewed. She later mentions regalia as in materiality and the significance it has to Indian religion and culture; however, popular culture has sucked the importance out of regalia and replaced it with poorly made Halloween costumes and skimpy Victoria’s Secret lingerie. One could view this as remix just by the fact that people are “mixed” in their genes and heritage. Although, I do not see how her article itself is remix; however, I feel the content that she writes about is.

In regards to Gloria Anzaldua’s novel, Borderlands, she switched between Spanish and English throughout her text. We discussed this in class and determined that this is labeled “code switching.” She integrates two languages together to form one work; in Lessig’s eyes, this is considered remix (well, as is everything else). Like Arola, Anzaldua speaks of Indian culture. She tells her story, meanwhile, shifting from Spanish to English and back again. I feel like this is remix in as far as the language mixing. I feel it is an autobiography that she has compiled from her memories and cultural moments.

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